A note on enrollment: WRT is one of only two providers offering NOLS Wilderness Medicine courses in the Northeast. Space on all of these courses is limited and courses typically fill early. We recommend enrolling at least 30-45 days prior to the start of your course to secure a spot.

Our Wilderness First Aid class is a fun, hands-on, weekend-long introduction to the principles of wilderness medicine. Hiker? Mountain biker? Climber? If you enjoy spending time off the grid, this course is for you. From canoeing in the Adirondacks and backcountry skiing in Vermont to micro adventures in your own backyard, these skills will serve you and your family well, wherever you recreate. The WFA is the standard professional certification for camp counselors, scout leaders, and school teachers who lead extended field trips.

The WFA is an introductory class; no prior medical experience is needed. You'll learn the Patient Assessment System, how to provide effective treatments for common injuries and illnesses, and how to decide when it's time to evacuate your patient. WFA classes are also a great place to meet like minded partners for future outdoor adventures. Learn about getting college credit for your WFA from our curriculum provider, NOLS Wilderness Medicine.

Students consistently report that highlights of their WFA course include realistic scenarios, hands on practice with splinting, bleeding control, and other basic first aid skills, plus engaging and interactive instruction by professional guides.

"People get hurt on level ground, on warm, partially cloudy days when you feel well rested and prepared to handle an emergency...." Said no one, ever! We'll venture outdoors to practice our skills regardless of the weather, so come prepared for rain, snow, sun and everything in-between.

WFA as Re-cert: NOLS Wilderness Medicine and WMI certification holders may use these courses to re-certify their WAFA, WFR, or WEMT.  

16 hours over 2 days | 8 to 5 with an hour for lunch | Minimum age 16  

 
 
My instructors - can’t say enough about them. They worked very well with visual aids. Scenarios were excellent and very thorough. Public speaking skills were excellent and never lost the attention of the class. I feel like I know what to do now if one of my family gets hurt on the trail.
— John B, WFA Student, October 2016